• One resume does not fit all jobs; have different versions of your resume depending on the type of job you are applying for.
  • Make sure at least one other person proofreads your resume.
  • Be consistent in spacing, style, and size.
  • Continue reading to discover more tips regarding resume writing.

Click here to view a collection of attorney resume and cover letter resources written by experienced legal recruiters.

Numerous books have been written about resumes and many career professionals will try to convince you that there are hard and fast rules about proper resume drafting. What follows are my own thoughts and observations about resumes (in a very distilled form) along with some good samples that I have seen (and redacted).

Attorney Resume Writing Tips
 
  • Sample Litigation Resume
  • Sample Corporate Resume
  • Preparing a resume addendum can help to highlight the particular experience you have had and the responsibilities you assumed. The addendum is usually in the form of a case or transaction summary and can be divided up by type of case/transaction. It can also be organized functionally by skill (e.g. Motion Practice, Discovery, Trial Practice). Preparing such a summary is also a useful exercise in helping you to take stock in what you have done to date. It also helps to prepare you for an interview
A resume is a direct mail marketing piece (which may or may not arrive by mail). It is only designed to help a candidate secure an interview. The piece should be error free, accurate and tailored to the particular position for which the candidate is applying.
  It is my belief that many professionals in a job search spend too much time and energy thinking about and perfecting their resume (I was one of those professionals). Time spent getting the wording on the page absolutely "perfect" could be better spent networking.

Your resume is a summary that should emphasize those skills and experiences that are relevant to the job you want. It should not be a summary of everything that you have ever done or even necessarily every law related activity you have ever been involved with (unless omitting the information would distort your background or leave large gaps of time that go unexplained or unless the experience clearly demonstrates that you have closely related skills and experience).