New York University School Of Law Profile, New York, New York | BCGSearch.com

New York University School of Law

Rank 6

MAILING ADDRESS1

40 Washington Square South

New York, NY 10012

MAIN PHONE

212.998.6100

REGISTRAR'S PHONE

212-998-6040

ADMISSIONS PHONE

212-998-6060

CAREER SERVICES PHONE

212-998-6090

Overview 3

NYU Law is an intellectual powerhouse, with 106 faculty, 317 courses, 15 areas of study, over 30 centers, and over 80 student organizations.

The Law School has long taken a leadership role in introducing changes that have redefined legal education. Most recently, we launched initiatives to assure that our graduates are practice-ready for today's world. Highlights include: NYU Law Abroad; our Washington, DC-based Legislative and Regulatory Process Clinic; and our Leadership & Financial Literacy program.

Student-Faculty Ratio 4

8.2:1

Admission Criteria 5

LSAT GPA
25th-75th Percentile 166-171 3.65-3.89
Median* 169 3.81

Director of admissions Melanie Hochberg Giger
Application deadline February 15

Law School Admissions details based on 2016 data.

Admission Statistics 6

Approximate number of applications 6245
Number accepted 1858
Percentage accepted 29.8%

Law School Cost 7

Tuition and fees Full-time: $61,622 per year
Room and board $23,500
Books $1,300
Miscellaneous expenses $2,920

The above admission details are based on 2016 data.

Class Ranking and Grades 8

To a great degree, a student’s final grade in many of the courses offered at NYU School of Law is dependent upon the grade received on the final examination. As a result, adequate preparation for the examination cannot be recommended too highly. No grade will be recorded for a course or section of a course in which the student is not officially registered and retroactive registration is not permitted.

Grading System

The grading system used for J.D.s beginning Fall 1990 and LL.M.s beginning summer 1987 through summer 2008 was A, 4.0; A-, 3.67; B+, 3.33; B, 3.0; B-, 2.67; C, 2.0; D, 1.0 and F, 0. The new grading system for J.D.s and LL.M.s effective fall 2008 is A+, 4.33; A, 4.0; A-, 3.67; B+, 3.33; B, 3.0; B-, 2.67; C, 2.0; D, 1.0 and F, 0.

Other symbols used on Law School transcripts are:

CR (Credit). This symbol is used (1) to show successful completion of participation on student publications or as Teaching Assistants (J.D. students only), (2) in specified courses in which the student has elected the Credit option, rather than a grade (J.D. students only), (3) in cases where a student in good standing withdraws for military service, provided he or she does not receive a tuition refund and has continued in attendance through two-thirds of the semester for which credit is sought, and (4) in other cases where a student receives credit for completion of a course but the Executive Committee has decided that it would be impossible or improper to assign a grade to such work (e.g., a lost examination paper). A grade of credit cannot be granted for required courses and/or Directed Research. A grade of credit is awarded for certain zero credit LL.M. courses and the J.D. Lawyering course.

EXC (Excused). This symbol reflects an absence from an examination that has been excused by the Office of the Vice Dean for good cause. Where practical, the absence should be approved before the examination is scheduled to be given. If excused from the scheduled exam, the student may take the exam at the next time regularly scheduled during the student’s tenure at the Law School. If the course is required, the student must take the exam.

FAB (Fail/Absence). This symbol denotes an un-excused absence from an examination or an un-excused failure to hand in a take-home examination or paper in the time allowed by the instructor. If an excuse for absence is accepted as satisfactory by the Office of the Vice Dean or the Executive Committee, “FAB” will be replaced by “EXC.” If this absence is not excused, the grade of “FAB” will become final.

FX. This symbol denotes failure due to cheating or plagiarism or violation of other rules governing academic honesty. See the discipline rules beginning at page 46.

INC (Incomplete) / IP (In Progress). In the following situations, students received an “INC” prior to fall 2009; beginning fall 2009 students receive a grade of “IP.” This symbol is used in seminar courses, directed research, or similar study when the student has made prior arrangements with the instructor to submit work later than the end of the semester in which the course is given. Third-year students who have grades of incomplete in courses from prior semesters must complete and submit all work required for the course no later than May 1 of their sixth semester or at such earlier date as the faculty member requires. Full-time LL.M. students must submit a final version of incomplete work no later than May 1 of their second semester. The May 1 deadline is necessary to enable faculty sufficient time to evaluate the student’s work and submit a grade and for the School to be able to certify the student for graduation and to sit for the July bar exam. It is the student’s responsibility to arrange a submission schedule with the instructor. An extension may only be granted by the Office of the Vice Dean in consultation with the faculty member. 16 January graduates must submit all work required for the course by January 5, and September graduates by September 1. Part-time LL.M. students must adhere to the work submission deadline of the term in which they are graduating.

If the work remains incomplete at the end of this period, students will not be certified to graduate nor certified to sit for the bar UNLESS they have sufficient credits to graduate without the credit for the incomplete course. If the student has sufficient credits to graduate, the “INC” will be replaced by “WD.” The course work cannot be completed after the student has been certified to graduate.

If the work remains incomplete at the end of this period, and the student does not have sufficient credits to graduate, the “INC” will remain on the transcript for two years after which the “INC” will be replaced by “FAB.”

Because the faculty member who will be grading the student’s work may not be in residence at the School during the student’s final semester, students are advised to ascertain the expected whereabouts of any faculty member for whom they have yet to complete work and make arrangements for timely submission of their work so it can be graded in time for graduation and bar certification. This is the student’s responsibility. Students are advised that faculty members may be absent from the School for many reasons. For example, the faculty member may be on sabbatical or leave; or he or she may have been a visitor to the School or a Global Faculty Member who teaches intermittently and resides in a foreign country.

WD (Withdrew). This symbol denotes a withdrawal in writing from a course. Students who withdraw from a course by the last day of classes in the semester will not have a “WD” noted on their transcript. Thereafter, the student must take an examination or produce a paper (where the course is graded on the basis of a paper or the instructor agrees to allow a paper in lieu of examination). Failure to take an examination or produce a paper will result in an “FAB” unless for good cause, on timely application, the Executive Committee is willing to change the grade to a “WD.” A faculty member may require withdrawal with a grade of “WD” for poor attendance or for failure to make satisfactory progress.

Grade Normalization Curve

With the exception of the A+ rules, the guidelines do not apply at all to seminar courses, defined for this purpose to mean any course in which there are fewer than 28 students. In classes in which credit/fail grades are permitted, these percentages should be calculated only using students taking the course for a letter grade. If there are fewer than 28 students taking the course for a letter grade, the guidelines do not apply.

First-Year J.D. (Mandatory) All other J.D. (Non-Mandatory)
A+ 0-2% (target = 1%) 0-2% (target = 1%)
A 7-13% (target = 10%) 7-13% (target = 10%)
A- 16-24% (target = 20%) 16-24% (target = 20%)
Maximum for A tier 31% 31%
B+ 22-30% (target = 26%) 22-30% (target = 26%)
Maximum grades above B 57% 57%
B remainder remainder
B- 4-8% (target = 6%) 4-11% (target 7-8%)
C/D/F 0-5% 0-5%

1) The cap on the A+ grade is mandatory for all courses. However, at least one A+ can be awarded in any course. These rules apply even in courses, such as seminars, where fewer than 28 students are enrolled.

2) Normal statistical rounding rules apply for all purposes, so that percentages will be rounded up if they are above .5, and down if they are .5 or below. This means that, for example, in a typical first-year class of 89 students, 2 A+ grades could be awarded.

Honors 9

The Order of the Coif is a national society established to honor those law students who have attained high academic distinction in the study of law. The Order of the Coif takes its name and traditions from the ancient English organization from which judges were selected. Under the national constitution, membership is limited to the highest 10% of the senior class.

In order to be eligible for membership in the Order of the Coif, a graduating student must have completed at least 75% of his or her law studies in graded courses at NYU School of Law; and must be in the top 10% of the graduating class. Both 6-semester J.D.s and 4- semester J.D.s (transfer students or students who spend two semesters as a visitor at another law school) are eligible for Order of the Coif. However, in order for 4-semester J.D. students to be eligible and meet the 75% graded course minimum, at least 63 of the 83 credits required for graduation must be in NYU School of Law graded credits. Please note that additional tuition charges apply if a J.D. student exceeds 90 credits overall. The number of students eligible to be in the top 10% of the class is computed based on the entire class, including 4-semester J.D.s. Ten percent of the number of 4-semester J.D.s are calculated, and that number is the maximum number of 4-semester J.D.s eligible for Coif from among the top 10% of the entire class. The balance of the overall 10% number of slots are filled by 6-semester J.D.s only. Only grades posted by June 25 will be considered when calculating final Coif designations for 6-semester and 4-semester J.D.s.

Honor Criteria
summa cum laude To the very few students (if any in a particular year) who, in the judgment of the Executive Committee, have compiled a truly outstanding academic record.
magna cum laude To graduates whose grade point average places them in the top 10% of their class.
Cum laude To graduates whose grade point average places them in the top 25% of their class.
Pomeroy Scholars Following the first four semesters registered in the Law School (equivalent to a minimum of 54 law credits), the following designations will be made. These honors are not available to students who transferred to NYU School of Law in their second year.
Butler Scholars The ten students with the top cumulative grades after four semesters
Florence Allen Scholars The top 10% of students based on their cumulative four semester averages (other than Butler Scholars)
Robert McKay Scholars The top 25% of students based on their cumulative four semester averages (other than Butler and Allen Scholars)

Journals 10-18

Founded in 1942, the New York University Annual Survey of American Law is a student-edited journal at New York University School of Law. The Annual Survey is NYU’s second-oldest legal journal and was originally compiled by NYU faculty members as a comprehensive annual reference to developments in American law. Now a quarterly publication, the Annual Survey continues its dedication to exploring contemporary legal developments in the United States from a practice-oriented perspective. Annual Survey articles analyze emerging legal trends, interpret significant recent court decisions and legislation, and explain leading legal scholars’ and judges’ perspectives on current legal topics. The journal is widely distributed throughout the world, giving lawyers both inside and outside the United States insight into American law and legal issues.

The Environmental Law Journal (ELJ) is one of ten student-run publications at New York University School of Law. Together with the other journals, the ELJ participates in the annual Writing Competition to select staff editors. Students who have completed their first year at the law school are eligible to participate in the Writing Competition, which is distributed immediately following the last final exam of the spring semester. Students must register in advance to participate in the competition. Participants have approximately two weeks to complete the competition, which consists of a closed-universe (no additional research allowed) case comment and submission of personal statement to ELJ.

The NYU Journal of Intellectual Property and Entertainment Law began its development in 2009, when student leaders of NYU Law’s Intellectual Property and Entertainment Law Society found themselves confronted with the reality that NYU had no journal devoted to these increasingly important areas of the law. So, these proactive students undertook the extraordinary task of creating an entirely student-run and online publication called “The Ledger,” as an outlet for scholarly editorials and a forum for dialogue among legal practitioners, agents, and students, dedicated to analyzing issues in the fields of art, entertainment, intellectual property, internet, sports, and technology law. After only a few years, The Ledger had grown substantially and developed a major presence among the IP community at NYU Law.

Founded in 1968 with the aid of a Ford Foundation Grant, the New York University Journal of International Law and Politics features articles on international legal topics by leading scholars and practitioners, as well as notes, case comments, and book annotations written by Journal members. JILP readers include students, scholars, practitioners, and policymakers in more than sixty countries around the world. Visit the JILP Online Forum for the latest discussion.

New York University Journal of Law & Business (NYU JLB) is one of NYU School of Law’s most innovative academic journals, providing a forum for dialogue and analysis of current issues, ideas, and problems at the intersection of two dynamic fields: law and business. The Journal aims to contribute to academic scholarship, as well as the professional development of its readership, through the publication of pieces by both academics and practitioners.

The Journal of Law & Liberty is the first student-edited law journal dedicated to the critical exploration of classical liberal ideas. The Journal is dedicated to providing a forum for the debate of issues related to human freedom from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Recently, the Journal has published articles focusing on issues including the nature of rules and order, theories of rights and liberty, legal history, jurisprudence, constitutional law, historical and contemporary legislation. We seek scholarship from philosophers, jurisprudes, economists, and historians, as well as from lawyers.

Founded in 1924 as the Annual Review of the Law School of New York University, the New York University Law Review is a leading academic law journal committed to publishing, generating, and cultivating influential scholarship in service to the law. The Law Review publishes six issues a year: April, May, June, October, November, and December. We seek innovative ideas on a range of academic subject areas that boldly address the challenges we face today.

The Law Review has two principal aims: produce scholarship that shapes the rule of law, and train future leaders of the legal profession. Our contribution is not simply to publish scholarship that remains in the academy; we strive to elevate ideas and arguments that impact the law and society. We believe this commitment to public service includes training our members to become prominent legal minds and social leaders. Members of the Law Review analyze and evaluate pieces for publication, hone their editing skills, and improve their research and writing through the Law Review’s Note writing program.

Our dedication to shaping the legal field also requires representing the rich diversity—of ideas, identities, and viewpoints—within the greater society. Since publishing Women in the Law by Bertha Rembaugh in our first issue in 1924, the Law Review has been committed to selecting pieces on diverse topics and publishing scholarship written by authors from underrepresented backgrounds in the legal profession. Since the election of Frances Knoche Marlatt as our first woman Editor-in-Chief in 1925, the Law Review has been equally committed to selecting and supporting a community of members that reflects this diversity.

At the height of the political turmoil of the late 1960s, a group of activist students and professors at N.Y.U. School of Law came together and discussed the ways in which legal scholarship could respond to the injustices suffered by those relegated to society’s margins. These students and faculty felt that the dominant legal discourse found in countless law reviews failed to address sufficiently the gross inequities that existed (and continue to exist) along the lines of race, gender, class, sexuality, age, and ability.

The response of these students and academics was to establish the N.Y.U. Review of Law & Social Change. As the foreword to the first issue states, Social Change was “created to provide an outlet for student scholarship and analysis in areas of the law of particular interest to socially concerned attorneys.” That first issue contained four student-written articles, the commitments of the authors reflected in their topics: ineffective assistance of counsel for the poor, tactics for squatters in abandoned New York City buildings, reformation of laws regarding retaliatory evictions, and the legality of maximum grant regulations for welfare recipients.

Moot Court 19

The NYU Moot Court Board is one of NYU School of Law's student academic journals. Our mission is to enrich the legal education of our members and explore new approaches to unsettled legal questions through written and oral advocacy.

Clinical Programs 20-22

New York University School of Law's Jacob D. Fuchsberg Clinical Law Center has long been renowned for the quality of its faculty, the variety of its offerings, and the innovative structure of its curriculum. With 14 full-time clinical faculty and 38 clinics, NYU School of Law provides students with unparalleled experiences in working with clients and communities to address urgent problems, influence public policy, and improve the quality of legal problem-solving.

NYU School of Law offers the following year-long clinics. Each of these clinics is 14 credits and therefore accounts for roughly half of a student's course load for the academic year. (The only exception is the Civil Litigation-Employment Law Clinic, which carries 12 credits.) Please select from the links at the left to learn more about each clinic.

  • Civil Litigation - Employment Law Clinic
  • Criminal Defense and Reentry Clinic
  • Family Defense Clinic
  • Federal Defender Clinic
  • Global Justice Clinic - for JDs
  • Immigrant Rights Clinic
  • International Transactions Clinic - for JDs
  • Juvenile Defender Clinic
  • NYS Office of Attorney General Social Justice Externship

New York University School of Law offers the following semester-long clinics and externships. Please select from the links at the left to learn more about each clinic.

  • Brennan Center Public Policy Advocacy Clinic
  • Business Law Transactions Clinic
  • Civil Litigation - Employment Law Clinic, Semester-Long
  • Civil Rights Clinic
  • Comparative Criminal Justice Clinic: Focus on Domestic Violence
  • Criminal Appellate Defender Clinic
  • Education Advocacy Clinic
  • Education Sector Policy and Consulting Clinic
  • Environmental Law Clinic
  • Equal Justice and Defender Externship
  • EU Public Interest Clinic (Paris)
  • Federal Judicial Practice Externship
  • Global Justice Clinic - for LLMs
  • Government Civil Litigation Externship - Eastern District of New York
  • Government Civil Litigation Externship - Southern District of New York
  • Immigrant Defense Clinic
  • International Environmental Law Clinic
  • International Organizations Clinic
  • International Transactions Clinic - for LLMs
  • Legislative and Regulatory Process Clinic
  • LGBTQ Rights Externship
  • Local Prosecution Externship
  • Mediation Clinic
  • Mediation Clinic - Advanced: Dispute System Design
  • NYC Law Department Externship
  • New York Civil Liberties Clinic
  • Policing Project Externship
  • Policy Advocacy in Latin America (Buenos Aires)
  • PBSP Externship/Cinic: Litigation, Organizing and Systemic Change
  • Prosecution Externship - Eastern District of New York
  • Prosecution Externship - Southern District of New York
  • Racial Equity Strategies Clinic
  • Racial Justice Clinic
  • Regulatory Policy Clinic
  • Reproductive Justice Clinic
  • Advanced Reproductive Justice Clinic
  • Technology Law and Policy Clinic

Placement Facts 23

Starting Salaries (2014 Graduates Employed Full-Time)

Private sector (25th-75th percentile) $160,000
Private sector - Median $160,000
Public service – Median $55,000

Employment Details

Graduates known to be employed at graduation 88.9%
Graduates known to be employed ten months after graduation 90.3%

Areas of Legal Practice

Graduates Employed In Percentage
Law Firms 68.4%
Business and Industry 3.8%
Government 6.3%
Public Interest Organizations 13.5%
Judicial Clerkships 7.8%
Academia 0.2%
Unknown 0%

Externships/Internships

Externships24

The Federal Judicial Practice Externship is designed to teach students about federal practice through exposure to the workings of judicial chambers as well as class sessions that focus on substantive and practical issues of law. Students participating in the class dedicate their time to both a placement with a district court or appellate court judge and a weekly, two-hour seminar. To develop advocacy skills, all students are required to participate in a moot court argument before a panel of judges. While in chambers, students complete extensive research and writing projects, such as drafting bench memoranda, orders, or opinions on a broad range of subjects, including immigration, criminal law, habeas corpus, and complex commercial disputes. Students also are encouraged to attend court proceedings. Taught by Michelle Cherande and Judge Alison Nathan. (Offered Fall 2016)

Government Civil Litigation Externship

The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York, located in downtown Brooklyn at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge, is one of the premier U.S. Attorney’s Offices in the country. The EDNY’s Civil Division represents the interests of the United States in a wide range of affirmative civil actions involving Residential Mortgaged Back Securities, Civil Rights, Health Care Fraud, Defense Contractor Fraud, Mortgage Fraud, Civil and Criminal Asset Forfeiture, and Environmental Litigation. Its defensive practice, representing most Federal agencies, is also extraordinarily diverse, and includes bankruptcy cases, employment discrimination actions, and suits involving constitutional and common law torts. The USAO-EDNY selects up to twelve students to work as externs in its Civil Division each term. NYU also will select up to twelve students to participate in a seminar on civil litigation that is separate from, but complementary to, the externship. By participating in this externship, students will have an opportunity to learn about the inner workings of the federal justice system and government litigation. Each student will report to, assist and work under the supervision of one or two Civil Division Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSAs). Among other things, students help draft dispositive motions, complaints and answers, prepare written discovery demands, assist AUSAs in taking and defending depositions, in settlement negotiations and at trial. A few students each semester may have the opportunity to argue a motion before a federal district judge. The externship is designed to give students the broadest possible exposure to federal practice and the day-to-day tasks that litigators perform. The seminar meets weekly at the Law School for two-hour sessions to discuss, study, and learn how to perform those tasks as well as consider the strategic and tactical considerations that underlie litigation decisions. Students will also participate in in-class simulations to help them develop their advocacy skills. (Offered Fall 2017 and Spring 2018)

Government Civil Litigation Externship - Southern District of New York

The United States Attorney’s Office will select up to ten students for externships in the Civil Division of the United States Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York in Manhattan, one of the finest law offices in the country. Students will also participate in a seminar on government civil litigation in the Southern District of New York. The seminar is separate from, but complementary to, the externship. By participating in the externship, students will have an opportunity to learn about all aspects of litigation conducted by the government. Each student will report to, assist, and work under the supervision of one or two Civil Division Assistant United States Attorneys. Students will work closely with each of their supervisors in the investigation and litigation of civil cases in federal court in Manhattan and occasionally White Plains. The seminar meets weekly for two-hour evening sessions to discuss, study, and explore the many important roles of the government litigator. Classes will focus on ethical and strategic considerations in litigating cases, and will provide simulation opportunities in arguing motions, taking depositions, conducting settlement negotiations, and presenting opening statements. (Offered Fall 2017 and Spring 2018)

LGBTQ Rights Externship

Students will conduct fieldwork at NY-based non-profit organizations representing LGBTQ individuals. For the Spring 2017 semester, each of the course’s twelve students has been placed at one of eight partnering organizations: the Anti-Violence Project; Immigration Equality; Lambda Legal; the LGBTQ Rights Project at the New York Legal Assistance Group; the LGBT & HIV Project at Brooklyn Legal Services; the LGBT Law & Policy Initiative at the Legal Aid Society; the Peter Cicchino Youth Project at the Urban Justice Center; and the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. It is anticipated that a similar set of organizations will host students in future semesters. Substantive case work may include asylum petitions; discrimination claims; name and gender-marker changes; housing disputes; access to public assistance; and orders of protection. A seminar focusing on the unique legal issues faced by LGBTQ individuals completes the students’ work. Taught by Adjunct Professor Michael Kavey. (Offered Spring 2018)

The Local Prosecution Externship will immerse students in local prosecution, build concrete lawyering skills that lie at the heart of the prosecutorial function and exercise of discretion -- the interviewing, evaluation, and presentation of witnesses – and insure that each student develops the habit of critical reflection. It will use the evaluation and presentation of witnesses as the focus through which students learn to lawyer, consider difficult ethical issues, understand the scope and challenges of the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, and begin to develop case narratives. It combines two closely connected components: fieldwork in the office of the DANY (a minimum of 12-15 hours per week, depending on the office) and a weekly seminar that will support and supplement the on-site fieldwork. The seminar will employ a combination of readings, discussion, simulation and fieldwork case rounds to insure that every student achieves the goals of the externship. Taught by adjunct professor Evan Krutoy and Anne Milgram, professor of practice and a distinguished scholar in residence at the Law School. (Offered Spring 2018)

NYC Law Department Externship

Students in this clinic will be assigned to one of the Divisions of the City’s Law Department, which handles all of the legal business of the City, its agencies, and its officials. Divisions that have housed clinic externs in the past have included the Legal Counsel Division (which advises the Mayor and City agencies on proposed policy initiatives and legislation, such as those related to public health), the Affirmative Litigation Division (which brings suits on behalf of the City, including those brought against companies illegally selling untaxed cigarettes), and the Environmental Law Division (which advises City officials on environmental issues such as remediation). In their clinic roles, students will be assigned to work on matters with division attorneys. Work might include research on legal issues, written memoranda for Law Department attorneys or clients, and the drafting of legal papers. The goal of the clinic is to give students a broad introduction to the work of the City’s government and the lawyers who serve the government, whether by representing it in court or advising City officials on policy issues. Students will be expected to work approximately 10 hours per week at the Law Department. Taught by adjunct professors TBD. (Offered Fall 2017)

Policing Project Externship

The Policing Project at NYU Law is dedicated to bringing “front-end” accountability to policing, which is to say that instead of focusing on remedying policing misconduct after the fact, our attention is on changing policing policy and practice before things go wrong. We draft rules and best practices for policing agencies. We are working with police and communities all over the country—in Camden, Cleveland, Tampa, Tucson, Los Angeles, and New York—to give the public voice in policing practices and policies. We are working with policing agencies and methodologists from various fields to subject policing practices to rigorous cost-benefit analysis—including assessing the social costs of practices like stop-and-frisk or new surveillance technologies. We are ramping up to conduct a strategic litigation campaign to persuade courts to disallow novel policing practices unless there is democratic authorization, and to make sure those practices are applied in a non-discriminatory way. Students in the Policing Project Externship work closely with the Policing Project at NYU Law as well as its coalition partners on all these various endeavors. To the extent school schedules allow, our externs travel to our demonstration sites to work with community members and policing agencies. The Externship is offered in both Fall and Spring, and students may sign up for either or both semesters. Taught by Barry Friedman and Maria Ponomarenko (Offered Fall 2017 and Spring 2018) To apply for this Externship, please go to this page.

The Pro Bono Scholars Program (PBSP) is a program started during the 2014-2015 school year under special rules of the New York Court of Appeals that allows law students to take the New York Bar Exam in February of their 3L year if they commit to spending the last semester of law school working full time on pro bono work through the law school for credit. After law students take the Bar Exam in February, their entire courseload in the Spring semester (March through May) will consist of this clinic. During the 12 weeks of this reconfigured semester, per Court rules, students will be expected to spend approximately 50 hours each week participating in the externship’s/clinic’s fieldwork and seminar. The fieldwork performed in this clinic must provide legal services to the underserved. The Clinic offers structured fieldwork opportunities with Make the Road NY and the Education Advocacy Clinic. The PBSP program will also on a case by case basis partner to develop work experience opportunities with other fieldwork providers.Students working with MRNY will have the option of providing direct legal services in immigration, fair wage employment work, housing and health policy matters. Law students working with the Education Advocacy Clinic will represent low-income students in New York City school suspension hearings and special education cases. Taught by Professors Sarah E. Burns and Deborah Axt, with assist from Professors Randi Levine and Matthew Lenaghan for the Education Advocacy fieldwork training and supervision. (Offered Spring 2018)

Prosecution Externship - Eastern District of New York

The U.S. Attorney's Office will select up to ten students for externships in the Criminal Division of the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York (EDNY), located in Brooklyn. EDNY is a national leader in the prosecution of federal crimes, including terrorism, cybercrime, public corruption, organized crime, civil rights, business and securities fraud, violent crime and human trafficking. NYU will also select up to ten students to participate in a seminar on criminal prosecution that is separate from, but complementary to, the externship. By participating in this externship, students will have an opportunity to learn about the inner workings of the federal criminal justice system. Each student will report to, assist and work under the supervision of one or two Criminal Division Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSAs) in the investigation and prosecution of criminal cases in federal court in Brooklyn. The students' work may include, for example, helping AUSAs who are preparing for trial, interviewing federal agents, attending proffers of cooperating witnesses, and drafting motions. Every student will appear in court on behalf of the United States at a bail hearing and/or other proceeding. The seminar meets weekly at the Law School for two-hour sessions to discuss, study, and explore the many important roles of the prosecutor in the federal criminal justice system. Classes will focus on ethical and strategic considerations in exercising prosecutorial authority and other challenges facing prosecutors. In particular, classes will examine how federal prosecutors may influence criminal cases at all stages of development, investigation and arrest through investigative technique, charging decisions, plea bargaining and sentencing. Students will also participate in in-class simulations to help them improve their advocacy skills. (Offered Fall 2017 and Spring 2018)

Prosecution Externship - Southern District of New York

The United States Attorney’s Office will select up to ten students for externships in the Criminal Division of the United States Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York in Manhattan, recognized nationally as one of the finest prosecution offices in the country. Students will also participate in a seminar on criminal prosecution in the Southern District of New York. The seminar is separate from, but complementary to, the externship. By participating in the externship, students will have an opportunity to learn all about the inner workings of the federal criminal justice system. Each student will report to, assist, and work under the supervision of one or two Criminal Division Assistant United States Attorneys. Students will work closely with each of their supervisors in the investigation, preparation, and prosecution of criminal cases in federal court in Manhattan. The seminar meets weekly for two-hour evening sessions to discuss, study, and explore the many important roles of the prosecutor in the federal criminal justice system. Classes will focus on ethical and strategic considerations in exercising prosecutorial authority and other challenges facing prosecutors. In particular, classes will examine how federal prosecutors may influence criminal cases at all stages of development, investigation and arrest through investigative technique, charging decisions, plea bargaining and sentencing. (Offered Fall 2017 and Spring 2018)

Internships25

The PILC Summer Funding Program includes several special paid internships. Students interested in these fellowships must complete special program applications in addition to completing program requirements for PILC Summer Funding, since payment will be administered through the Summer Funding Program.

  • International Law and Human Rights Summer Fellowship Program
  • The Hague Conference on Private International Law Summer Fellowship
  • Helaine Barnett Fellowship at the Legal Services Corporation
  • Sudler Family Fellowship
  • Guarini Center Summer Internships in Public Interest Environmental and Land Use Law

Student Organizations 26

  • African Law Association
  • AGL-NYU Mentoring Program
  • Alternative Breaks
  • American Constitution Society
  • Anti-Trafficking Advocacy Coalition (ATAC)
  • Art Law Society
  • Asia Law Society
  • Asian-Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA)
  • Black Allied Law Students Association (BALSA)
  • Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence
  • Brazilian Legal Society
  • Canadian Law Organization
  • Christian Legal Fellowship
  • Class Gift Campaign
  • Coalition on Law & Representation (CoLR)
  • Commentator (Student Newspaper)
  • Deans' Cup
  • Defender Collective
  • Disability Allied Law Students Association (DALSA)
  • Domestic Violence Advocacy Project (DVAP)
  • Education Law and Policy Society
  • Environmental Law Society (ELS)
  • Fair Defense Project
  • Federalist Society
  • First Generation Professionals
  • Food Law
  • Health Law and Policy Society (HLPS)
  • High School Law Institute (HSLI)
  • HIV Law Society
  • If/When/How
  • Immigrant Rights Project
  • Intellectual Property & Entertainment Law Society (IPELS)
  • International Arbitration Association (IAA)
  • International Law Society (ILS)
  • I-PREP
  • International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP)
  • J. Reuben Clark Law Society
  • JD/MBA Association
  • Japanese Law Society
  • Jewish Law Students Association
  • Jiggery Pokery
  • Jurisprudence and Philosophy Group (JPG)
  • Latino Law Students Association (LaLSA)
  • Law & Business Association
  • Law and Government Society
  • Law and Religion Society
  • Law Revue
  • Law Students for Economic Justice (LawSEJ)
  • Law Students for Israel
  • Law Students for Justice in Palestine
  • Law Students of Catan
  • Law Women
  • Learned Foot
  • Legal Outreach
  • Media Law Collaborative
  • Men of Diversity, Excellence, and Leadership (MoDEL)
  • Mental Health Law and Justice Association
  • Middle Eastern Law Students Association (MELSA)
  • Muslim Law Students Association
  • National Lawyers Guild (NLG)
  • NYU Law Democrats
  • NYU Law Midwest Society
  • NYU Law Orators
  • NYU Legal Aid Chapter
  • NYU Mediation Organization (NMO)
  • Older Wiser Law Students (OWLS)
  • Open Meditation and Yoga Association (OM)
  • OUTLaw
  • Prisoners' Rights & Education Project (PREP)
  • Prosecution Legal Society
  • Public Interest Law Foundation (PILF)
  • Public Interest Law Student Association (PILSA)
  • Real Estate & Urban Policy Forum
  • Recent College Graduate Mentors
  • Research, Education & Advocacy to Combat Homelessness (REACH)
  • Social Enterprise & Startup Law Group (SE-SL)
  • South Asian Law Students Association (SALSA)
  • Space Law Society
  • Sports Law Association
  • Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF)
  • Student Bar Association (SBA)
  • Student Lawyer Athletic Program (SLAP)
  • Students for the Education and Representation of Veterans (SERV)
  • Substantial Performance
  • Supreme Court Forum
  • Suspension Representation Project (SRP)
  • Transfer Student Committee
  • Trial Advocacy Society
  • Unemployment Action Center (UAC)
  • Washington Square Legal Services Bail Fund
  • West Coast Connection (WCC)
  • Women of Color Collective (WoCC)

References

  1. http://its.law.nyu.edu/directories/
  2. http://www.law.nyu.edu/recordsandregistration/contactus
  3. http://www.law.nyu.edu/about
  4. http://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/new-york-university-03110
  5. http://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/new-york-university-03110/admissions
  6. http://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/new-york-university-03110/admissions
  7. http://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/new-york-university-03110/cost
  8. http://www.law.nyu.edu/sites/default/files/upload_documents/gradesAcademicStandards.pdf
  9. http://www.law.nyu.edu/sites/default/files/upload_documents/gradesAcademicStandards.pdf
  10. https://annualsurveyofamericanlaw.org/aboutus/
  11. http://www.nyuelj.org/about-us/
  12. http://jipel.law.nyu.edu/about/
  13. http://nyujilp.org/about/
  14. http://www.nyujlb.org/about/
  15. http://lawandlibertyblog.com/about/
  16. http://www.nyulawreview.org/about
  17. http://www.nyumootcourt.org/
  18. http://socialchangenyu.com/about/
  19. http://www.nyumootcourt.com/
  20. http://www.law.nyu.edu/academics/clinics
  21. http://www.law.nyu.edu/academics/clinics/year
  22. http://www.law.nyu.edu/academics/clinics/semester
  23. http://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/new-york-university-03110/career-prospects
  24. http://www.law.nyu.edu/academics/clinics/semester
  25. http://www.law.nyu.edu/publicinterestlawcenter/forstudents/special-summer-internship-programs
  26. http://www.law.nyu.edu/studentorganizations

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