Emory Law School Profile, Atlanta, Georgia | BCGSearch.com

Emory Law School

Rank 22

MAILING ADDRESS1

1301 Clifton Road NE

Atlanta, GA 30322-2770

MAIN PHONE

404-727-6816

REGISTRAR'S PHONE

404-727-6042

ADMISSIONS PHONE

404-727-6802

CAREER SERVICES PHONE

404-727-6513

Overview 5

In 1916, Emory University established a law school with a faculty of great teachers with degrees from the most highly regarded institutions of the era, a library of over 5,000 volumes, and a class of twenty-seven students.

Today, Emory University School of Law combines a practical and disciplined view toward the study of law with a commitment to providing its students experiential learning opportunities that engage them in the varied and integral roles the law plays in our community, society, and the world. Emory Law’s student-centered focus, innovative programs, externships, and commitment to scholarly research ensure our graduates are prepared to make an immediate impact after graduation.

Student-Faculty Ratio 6

11.4:1

Admission Criteria 7

LSAT GPA
25th-75th Percentile 157-166 3.4-3.87
Median 165 3.78

The above LSAT and GPA data pertain to the fall 2016 entering class.

Director of admissions Ethan Rosenzweig
Application deadline March 1

Law School Admissions details based on 2016 data.

Admission Statistics

Approximate number of applications 4016
Number accepted 1482
Percentage accepted 36.9%

The above admission details are based on 2016 data.

Law School Cost 8

Tuition and fees Full-time: $53,350 per year
Room and board $17,972
Books $1,536
Miscellaneous expenses $4,174

Class Ranking and Grades 9

Grade Point Average: JD Students

GPAs are calculated using the minimum passing grade for each class. In order for the law school registrar to certify each student to the university registrar as having met the graduation requirements, the law school registrar must receive certification from each professor that no graduating student has failed an exam. Before exams begin, the registrar will send the faculty a memo with the exam number of every graduating student. After each exam, faculty go through their exams, pull out all papers for graduating students, and look over these exams to make sure they are passing. The registrar will notify the student if an exam does not pass. A student in this situation would still be able to participate in the graduation ceremony but would not receive a real diploma. Provided the student was not in academic difficulty, he/she would attend summer school to complete the required number of credit hours and then graduate in August.

Grade Point Average and Class Rank: JM, LLM, MCL, and SJD Students

Grade point average (GPA) will be determined for graduate students, although class rank is not calculated. Because graduate students are graded separately from JD students, they do not impact the JD grading curve or class rank.

Grading: JD students

Juris Doctor Students

Emory University School of Law uses a letter grading system, with grades ranging from A+ to F. In the JD program, a student must make a grade of at least D- to receive credit for course. A student must repeat a required course in which that student has received a grade below D-. Once a student has received an exam, he or she must complete the exam. If a student does not submit any answers, that student will receive an automatic grade of F. Partial credit may be given if a student begins the exam but does not complete it.

When a student, without permission or a valid excuse, fails to appear for an examination or appears for an examination and fails to turn in the examination, that student will receive a course grade of F. Before the time indicated in the Academic Calendar for final examinations, a schedule of examinations will be published. Special scheduling or deferral of a final examination is permitted only when the cause is beyond the control of the student and only with approval of the Dean or Dean's designate. A grade of I (incomplete) is given to indicate an authorized deferral of examination or required course work. Required course work or deferred examination must be completed by the close of the term in which the course is next offered or grade of I (incomplete) will automatically be converted to a final grade of F. Examination papers are identified solely by randomly selected student examination numbers and not by student names. New numbers are issued each semester.

Grading: Mandatory/Recommended Mean

A mean of 3.30 is mandatory in every non-seminar class in which more than ten Emory JD students are taking the class for a grade, and no portion of a student’s grade is group-based. A mean of 3.30 is recommended in all excluded classes.

Grading: JM, LLM, and SJD Students

Emory University School of Law uses a letter grading system, with grades ranging from A+ to F. In the SJD, LLM, and JM programs, a student must earn a grade of at least D- to receive credit for a course. A student must repeat a required course in which that student has received a grade below D-. Once a student has received an exam, he or she must complete the exam. If a student does not submit any answers, the student will receive an automatic grade of F. Partial credit may be given if a student begins the exam but does not complete it. SJD, LLM, and JM students who were required to submit a TOEFL or IELTS with their application will get 25% additional time to take their exams.

When a student, without permission or a valid excuse, fails to appear for an examination, or appears for an examination and fails to turn in the examination, they will receive a course grade of F. Before the time indicated on the Academic Calendar for final examinations, a schedule of examinations will be published. Special scheduling or deferral of a final examination is permitted only when the cause is beyond the control of the student and only with approval of the Dean or Dean's designate. A grade of I (incomplete) is given to indicate an authorized deferral of examination or required course work. Required course work or a deferred examination must be completed by the close of the term in which the course is next offered or the grade of I (incomplete) will automatically be converted to a final grade of F.

Examination papers are identified solely by randomly selected student examination numbers and not by student names. New numbers are issued each semester.

All students are reminded that it is faculty policy that examinations are to be taken on the day and at the time scheduled, unless an individual is excused by emergency, illness, or involuntarily assumed obligations on the day of the examination. Students in joint programs who find that they have a conflict with another school AT THE TIME OF THE EXAMINATION in the Law School should advise the office of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs in advance of the examination period, so that the conflict can be resolved. Every effort must be made to eliminate the conflict in the other school, as law school exams are rescheduled only as a last resort.

If the exam conflict occurs during the first week of exams, the make-up will be on the first make-up day. Likewise, exams which conflict during the second week are to be made up on the second make-up day. Any student with three 9 a.m. exams on three consecutive days is permitted to move the third 9 a.m. exam to the first make-up day AFTER the exam. When a student has two examinations within a 24-hour period, such as at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on the same day, or at 2 p.m. and 9 a.m. the next day, he/she may postpone one exam to the next make-up day. While it is often the 2 p.m. exam that is rescheduled, these conflicts are all evaluated by the Office of Student Affairs and rescheduling is done to create the most efficient make-up exam schedule. All exam conflicts should be raised with, and must be resolved with the consent of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. Exams scheduled for the same time slot pose a conflict that will be resolved by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. Make-up exams are never scheduled before the exam is administered on the scheduled date. Take-home exams are not considered to pose a conflict.

Grade Normalization (Curve)10

  • The regular, professional curriculum of the law school is a full-time day program leading to the juris doctor (JD) degree.
  • New students are accepted only in the Fall semester.
  • The JD degree is conferred on a student who has completed 90 semester hours of course credit as prescribed by the faculty, with a minimum overall grade point average of 2.25.
  • For all JD students who are expected to graduate in or after the Spring of 2019, six of the required 90 semester hours of course credit must be experiential learning credits as defined by ABA Standard 303. For more information about the Six-Credit Experiential Learning Requirement, see our Frequently Asked Questions page For a complete list of Emory Law's Approved Experiential Learning Courses, see the approved courses list.
  • Three academic years (six semesters) of resident study are required.
  • For all degree programs, the majority of required credits for graduation must be earned at Emory Law.
  • Joint-degree JD students must earn a minimum of 79 law school hours.
  • Students who transfer to Emory Law from another US JD program who wish to earn a joint degree must earn 79 of 90 hours from the law curriculum. (Exceptions are made at the discretion of the vice dean.)
  • Students who achieve a semester average of 3.45 are designated on the Dean's List that semester.
  • The JD with Honors is conferred on each student whose scholastic average for his or her entire law school program is 3.45 or higher.
  • The JD with High Honors is conferred on each student whose scholastic average for his or her entire law school program is 3.8 or higher.
  • JD students must complete all juris doctor degree requirements within 84 months of initial matriculation.

Honors 11

Juris Doctor Students

JD students with a final cumulative average of 3.45 graduate with Honors.

JD students with a final cumulative average of 3.80 graduate with High Honors.

Transfer students are graduated with High Honors or Honors if their averages on work at Emory meet the above requirements.

Emory students transient elsewhere are eligible for graduation with High Honors or Honors if (1) their average for work done at Emory was 3.80/3.45 or above and (2) their average grade for work done while on transient status was at least a B or equivalent numerical grade.

The First Honor Graduate is the student in the graduating class with the highest overall academic average computed on all three years of work done at Emory (summer school attendance excluded).

Juris Master and Master of Laws Students

One LLM Leadership Award and one JM Leadership Award will be presented each year. These leadership awards will be given to an LLM and JM student who engages with the Law School community, exhibits leadership and concern for the well-being of students, and has done well academically.

Journals 12

Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal

Published since 1984 and the only student-run bankruptcy journal in the United States, the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal provides a forum for research, debate, and information for practitioners, scholars, and the public. The EBDJ also hosts a symposium in the spring.

Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review

The Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review explores the relationship between the corporation and its stakeholders in the United States and abroad. This online-only publication addresses issues of who the relevant stakeholders are and how far corporate responsibility to them should extend.

Emory International Law Review

The student-run Emory International Law Review enjoys a worldwide reputation as a leader in international scholarship. The print and online EILR publishes articles on subjects ranging from human rights to international intellectual property issues to freedom of religion and belief.

Emory Law Journal

Founded in 1952 as the Journal of Public Law, the student-edited Emory Law Journal has been publishing academic, professional, and student-authored pieces on the full range of legal subjects since 1978. ELJ publishes six issues of legal scholarship along with ELJ Online, its online companion. ELJ also hosts the Randolph W. Thrower Symposium in the spring semester, bringing together legal scholars from across the country to discuss timely legal topics.

IP Theory

IP Theory, founded in 2010 at Indiana University Maurer School of Law, is an online, peer-edited, open-access intellectual property law publication. In 2013, Emory Law joined as a partner of the publication. Neither law journal nor blog, it occupies a niche between the two. It serves as a new forum for essays and opinion pieces that are more concise than typical law journal articles, as well as book and other literature reviews.

Journal of Law and Religion

The Journal of Law and Religion is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal edited by the Center for the Study of Law and Religion, with student participation, and published in collaboration with Cambridge University Press. Since 1982, JLR has been the leading academic journal publishing interdisciplinary and interfaith scholarship at the the intersection of law and religion. In 2013, JLR became an Emory-edited journal.

Moot Court 13

The Moot Court Society is a competitive, student-run organization that provides experiential opportunities to develop oral advocacy and brief-writing skills. Emory Law students organize and host the annual Civil Rights and Liberties Moot Court Competition, held at Emory Law in the Fall semester.

Membership in Moot Court Society is open to all full-time students, properly enrolled in Emory Law with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.35 and who satisfy the requirements of the membership listed below. Students enrolled in any joint JD degree program are considered properly enrolled for the purpose of membership, provided that other eligibility requirements are met.

Moot Court Society is comprised of 72 members. To satisfy the requirements for membership, a candidate must successfully compete in one intra-school competition and one interschool competition. On the basis of their brief-writing and oral advocacy scores in an intra-school competition, competitors will be placed on one of our special teams, and have the opportunity to compete in various interschool competitions around the country. When candidacy requirements have been satisfactorily met, these 72 candidates become eligible for membership in Moot Court Society.

Clinical Programs 14

Emory Law's legal clinics provide students with the foundational skills, judgment, and values necessary to engage in the practice of law.

Emory Law engages students in both substantive knowledge of the law and the practical application of skills learned in the classroom through our nationally acclaimed legal clinics. Students work under the supervision of clinical faculty and experienced attorneys as they advocate for clients with real-world legal needs, experience first-hand the challenges of the legal profession, and begin a lifetime commitment to public service. Emory’s for-credit clinics are on the Approved List of Experiential Courses and count toward the Six-Credit Experiential Learning Requirement. View our Frequently Asked Questions page for more information.

Clinical work performed by students provides an immeasurable benefit to the clients and agencies they serve.

Each clinic's docket is designed to fully immerse students in all aspects of the legal process, allowing them to take the lead on litigation, transactional, and policy matters at local, state, regional, national, and international levels. Clinics provide important, pro bono representation to individuals, community groups, and nonprofit organizations that may otherwise go unrepresented, an integral reflection of Emory Law's commitment to public service.

Barton Child Law Public Policy and Legislative Clinics:

The Barton Policy and Legislative Clinics are committed to the use of sound legal and scientific research and development of evidence-based reforms.

Barton Juvenile Defender Clinic:

The Barton Juvenile Defender Clinic (JDC) is dedicated to providing holistic legal representation for children in delinquency, educational advocacy, and status offense proceedings.

Barton Appeal for Youth Clinic:

Students in the Appeal for Youth Clinic provide holistic appellate representation of youthful offenders in the juvenile and criminal justice systems.

International Humanitarian Law Clinic:

The International Humanitarian Law Clinic works directly with organizations around the world to promote the law of armed conflict, enhance protections during wartime, and ensure accountability for atrocities.

Turner Environmental Law Clinic:

The Turner Environmental Law Clinic provides important pro bono legal representation to individuals, community groups, and nonprofit organizations that seek to protect and restore the natural environment for the benefit of the public.

Volunteer Clinic for Veterans:

The Volunteer Clinic for Veterans is a not-for-credit organization that provides pro bono assistance to those who have served our country with the legal issues that they face, including claims for service-connected disability.

Placement Facts 15

Starting Salaries (2015 Graduates Employed Full-Time)

Private sector (25th-75th percentile) $80,000 - $$160,000
Median in the private sector $120,000
Median in public service $59,134

Employment Details

Graduates known to be employed at graduation 55.2%
Graduates known to be employed ten months after graduation 81.8%

Areas of Legal Practice

Graduates Employed In Percentage
Law Firms 53.3%
Business and Industry 9.1%
Government 18.1%
Judicial Clerkships 5.7%
Public Interest Organizations 9.1%
Academia 5%
Unknown 0%

Externships/Internships 16

Externships

Take the skills and principles you learn in the classroom and learn how they apply in practice. Emory Law's Externship Program provides work experience in different types of practice so you can determine which suits you best and develop relationships that will continue as you begin your legal career.

Externships are an educational experience in every sense. Students learn about being professionals. You discover that real attorneys and judges wrestle with and take seriously real ethical issues every day, believe in the value of service regardless of their area of practice, and are committed deeply to their clients, the rule of law, and a high standard of excellence. You will also come to appreciate that, throughout your career, you should strive to improve your skills and knowledge to become better lawyers.

Student Organizations 17

  • American Constitution Society (ACS)
  • Amicus
  • Anti-Corruption Law Association
  • Asian American Law Students Association
  • Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal
  • Black Law Students Association
  • Christian Legal Society (CLS)
  • Emory J. Reuben Clark Law Society
  • Emory Law Journal (ELJ)
  • Emory Law School Supreme Court Advocacy Project (ELSSCAP)
  • Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review
  • EPIC (Emory Public Interest Committee)
  • Federalist Society
  • Emory International Law Review
  • If/When/How (formally Law Students for Reproductive Justice )
  • International Refugee Assistance Project
  • JD/MBA Society
  • JM Society
  • Jewish Law Students Association (JLSA)
  • Latin American Law Students Association (LALSA)
  • Law School Democrats
  • Legal Association for Women Students (LAWS)
  • Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights
  • Mock Trial
  • Emory Moot Court Society
  • Muslim Law Students Association
  • National Lawyers Guild (NLG)
  • Oil, Gas & Energy Law Association
  • Emory OutLaw
  • Phi Alpha Delta
  • SJD Society
  • Space Organization of Law and Research (SOLAR)
  • Social Enterprise at Emory Law
  • South Asian Law Students Association
  • Street Law
  • Student Animal Legal Defense Fund
  • Student Bar Association (SBA)
  • Student Legal Services
  • Students for Life
  • Transfer Student Association

References

  1. http://law.emory.edu/index.html
  2. http://registrar.emory.edu/about/contact/index.html
  3. http://law.emory.edu/admission/index.html
  4. http://law.emory.edu/careers/contact-us.html
  5. http://law.emory.edu/about/history-mission.html
  6. https://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/emory-university-03039
  7. https://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/emory-university-03039/admissions
  8. https://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/emory-university-03039/cost
  9. http://law.emory.edu/academics/registrar/academic-catalog/index.html#accordion-panel-N1E6EC
  10. http://law.emory.edu/academics/jd-degree-program/index.html
  11. http://law.emory.edu/academics/registrar/academic-catalog/index.html#accordion-panel-N1E6EC
  12. http://law.emory.edu/academics/law-journals/index.html
  13. http://law.emory.edu/student-life/student-organizations/moot-court.html
  14. http://law.emory.edu/academics/clinics/index.html
  15. http://premium.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/emory-university-03039/career-prospects
  16. http://law.emory.edu/academics/academic-programs/externships/
  17. http://law.emory.edu/student-life/student-organizations/index.html

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